MRPtA Draft 00

PROLOGUE

“Every picture tells a story, don't it?” — Rod Stewart

MRPtA

My mLearnCon proposal was accepted by the eLearning Guild: Yea! So now the work begins.

Screen capture of mLearn conference agenda
 

DRAFT 00

I had thought to do my talk on a case study but during a chat on Twitter someone suggested a different spin.

Screen capture of a tweet suggesting my talk be done workshop style.
EPILOGUE

So that's where I'm at now, ideating how it might work. Good things happen, I've found, when you throw ideas out there.

 

 

 

Sticky Learning

PROLOGUE

How do you figure out if your learners get it?

STICKY

How about if we ask them? Only we do it immediately after the event rather than in a survey weeks or months later. A little while ago I read this tweet in my Twitter timeline.

I clicked on the link and.. wow moment.

LEARNING

I design transformational learning experiences for online and face-to-face training modalities. Exit slips are definitely transformational, at least for my adult learning population.

Screen capture of a sticky note asking that reservation process be drawn and described

I'm thinking the way it would work is following a lesson or activity asking learners to complete an exit ticket. Rather than all learners being asked the same question there would be several questions. On leaving the session learners would post their sticky note response on a wall. The instructors then review the tickets to see how sticky the learning was.

EPILOGUE

This fits somewhere in between formative and summative assessment. It helps learners to recall the new information they were exposed to while giving the instructor a snapshot into how well the know-how transferred. Thank you @BergsEyeView and @SciencePenguin for a cool idea.

 

Lucky Break

PROLOGUE

I caught a lucky break the other day. A nasty bug sent me to hospital for a few days of rest, recuperation, and reflection.

LUCKY

It's been like a prolonged visit to the movies, sneaking from one theater to the next to watch them all for the price of one.

Photo of a movie theatre refreshment counter

I got to watch some old movies on Netflix and catch up on some reading. Or I would have read some books on cognition and learning except that they suddenly seemed painful to read. I realized that laid up as I was I needed to read something fun rather than a title to increase my professional knowledge.

BREAK

The book that found me was Andre Norton's Time Traders. It was really hard to put down. It wasn't just the story, it was how it made me feel.

Ages ago, whilst serving with the U.S. Navy I read voraciously, mostly sci-fi and fantasy adventure titles. I loved how authors like Anthony, Asimov, McCaffrey, Asprin and many others spun tales that took me to all sorts of places where my imagination could take flight.

Something happened about 20 years ago, a little after I became a parent and had to settle down. I read for my kids but less and less for myself. A little later when I switched careers from electronics engineering to learning and development I began reading technical tomes about cognition, psychology and the textbooks that go with a masters degree in education. Interesting stuff but nothing in the same league as Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.

EPILOGUE

Andre Norton's Time Traders made me realize something profound. At least profound to me. When I travel to EdCamps for professional development I sometimes feel like an outsider. While I am an educator I serve adult learners. The teachers, librarians, administrators, and support staff that make up EdCamp's intended population work with children in K-12. My outsider feeling changed reading Time Traders. Norton describes traders as people who move about from place to place sharing information. They look and act a little differently because they are different. I don't have to worry about where I fit in. I just do.

 

#havpassion LBWA

PROLOGUE

In a gadda de vida, baby..” — Iron Butterfly, 1968

#havpassion

A week ago there was this #EduCon thing: a gathering of educators back east, Philly maybe. I wasn't there. Even so, thanks to the marvels of the Internet and social media I followed along via this thing called a backchannel. A backchannel, as I understand it, is the chatter that goes on among a presenter's audience whilst they're presenting. Only this chatter takes place online through apps like a Twitter.

One session on having passion resonated (#havpassion). My takeaway is that we, everyone actually, should try finding what brings us joy and fulfillment. Once found, we should integrate it into our lives as much as possible.

Screen capture of a hashtag have passion YouTube clip
LBWA
Learning by walking around (LBWA) listening and sharing with others has been the bulk of my professional development (PD) efforts the last 15 months. #havpassion reminded my that like #tlap (Teaching Like A Pirate) I should take courage to heart when I go into uncharted waters. Being a Navy veteran I know that at the end of an adventure lay an amazing sea story. Stories like ideas are at their best when they're shared.
We all learn when we share. This is true even when our understanding is incomplete. In A Gadda Da Vida was gibberish when I first heard it. Sharing my interest in the song with friends I learned the lyrics. Walking around and sharing has benefitted me immensely throughout my life.
EPILOGUE
While reflecting on #havpassion I came up with an idea. Told via Plotagon (animation and storytelling app) over several brief video clips, I describe an outline of what a new hire orientation learning activity might look like. Feel free to take a peek.

 

 

Favorite Teacher

PROLOGUE

“The Major..” — CDB (Christina Davies Beeson)

FAVORITE

I met CDB in 1971. I was a high school sophomore enrolled in her College English 2 section. I hadn't chosen to be in her class; some clerk in the office had decided that she and I were a good fit. Surprisingly enough, I didn't realize until much later, we were.

Photograph of Mrs. Christina Davies Beeson

(Photo credit: San Bernardino Sun-Telegram)

CDB was the first Teach Like a Pirate (TLAP) teacher I'd ever met. She was in your face dynamic. She expected results.

TEACHER

Back when I taught multimedia production and Flash development I copied her style: creative presentation to engage students, setting high expectations for assignments that students thought up themselves, and being accessible. When I design learning experiences engagement and interactive are my watchwords.

EPILOGUE

I didn't learn about TLAP until 2013. It amazes me how what was old (CDB's approach) is new again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unordinary

PROLOGUE

“If you want a different outcome than you're used to you should try something different.” — seen on Twitter

UNORDINARY

Inspiration, motivation, a kick in the seat of the pants: Take your pick or add your own. Navasota (Texas) Intermediate principal/lead learner @techninjatodd has a way of making things happen. Hearing that he was doing another Educators Learning Series I couldn't help but sign on. His first challenge is about goals for the new year.

He suggests we identify #onelittleword that expresses what we will try to do this year. Mine is #unordinary.

Sketch of the made up word unordinary

Adopt an unordinary approach for your PD

I went un rather than extra because we're not talking major change and commitment all at once. I look at it as making subtle changes a day at a time.
EPILOGUE
My inspiration for this comes from author and teacher @donwettrick who suggests one “starts small.”

 

Sow Your Work

PROLOGUE

“For everything there is a season..” — Eccliastes 3:1

SOW

Here's an idea that I think will lead to fruition. Explaining the instructional design process to others can be challenging at times. Visuals can help make selling ideas and strategies easier.

Freytag's Pyramid offers a way to diagram stories. Modified just a little bit I think it offers instructional designers an appealing easy to understand way of presenting spaced learning strategies to customers.

YOUR WORK
Each segment of the pyramid is listed below.
  1. A Tantalizing story hooks learner and presents topic material ~ 20 minutes
  2. B Learner chooses a practice problem to work through
  3. C Review practice with all learners
  4. D Resolve issues
  5. X Activity ends
EPILOGUE

I tried it out in a meeting last night. It seemed to take. The conversation afterwards moved towards “What ifs” from “And then”. Good thing?