#etmooc Not a four letter word (anymore)

Two days have passed since the collaborative #etmooc experience. I'm catching up: The weather is much improved and I have a reliable Internet connection with which to move data. The point of this post is the cMOOC (connectivist Massive Open Online Course) as described during the #etmooc Orientation Week Activity.

A few days before #etmooc began I read in a research paper where elaborative interrogation and self-explanation were found to be highly effective learning techniques (Dunlosky, Rawson, Marsh, Nathan & Willingham, 2013). The self-explanation part I understood right off: framing what I read or experience within what I already know. I'm coming to understand, finally after a couple years groping for meaning, that the elaborative interrogation piece comes (best for me) from connecting with others of like-mind.

So there you are: dawning understanding of how research, educational technology and social media come together to foster learning.

More later.

References

Dunlosky, J., Rawson, K.A., Marsh, E.J., Nathan, M.J., Willingham, D.T. 2013). Improving Students’ Learning with effective Learning techniques: Promising directions from cognitive and educational psychology. Retrieved January 16, 2013 from the Psychological Science in the Public Interest website at http://psi.sagepub.com/content/14/1/4.full.pdf?ijkey=Z10jaVH/60XQM&keytype=ref&siteid=sppsi

 

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